Ramya Nagesh

Viewing: Misconduct and Compliance for Ramya Nagesh

Ramya joined No5 Chambers in January 2015 after completing her pupillage at a 6 Kings Bench Walk, and a further twelve months practising at 2 Hare Court.
Ramya has built a wealth of expertise in a range of criminal matters, acting for both prosecution and defence. She has experience representing individuals and corporations, and has advised on a range of matters. This includes assisting with advice as to the application of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2002, advice regarding police representation at a death in custody inquest, and the scope of Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights in police surveillance operations.
She has quickly developed a busy Crown Court practice, appearing in trials, sentences, appeals, pre-trial hearings and Proceeds of Crime Act applications.
In addition, Ramya has particular experience representing police officers in both criminal and inquest proceedings. She has therefore developed understanding of the specific issues and concerns facing officers finding themselves the subject of criminal proceedings, or as interested persons at an inquest.
Ramya has experience of tribunals and ‘quasi-criminal’ work, she regularly acts in parole board hearings, and has acted in inquest and immigration tribunals. She has also assisted in drafting numerous submissions and advice in professional regulatory matters.
Ramya has the ability to turn her hand to complex and unique issues with ease. This was particularly demonstrated through her role in the team representing an interested person in the Hillsborough Inquest, throughout 2014.
Furthermore, Ramya was instructed in 2014 to represent an interested party in a large-scale inquiry into sexual and physical abuse of children in Jersey. Her role involved making decisions as to the disclosure of large volumes of material to the Inquiry.
Before coming to the Bar, Ramya specialised for several years in human rights and international criminal law. This included a year in The Hague, where she worked in the legal team of the Victims and Witnesses Unit of the International Criminal Court, as well as the International Criminal Law Network. She also worked for several months at the Kurdish Human Rights Project, London, and the South Indian Cell for Human Rights Monitoring and Education, Bangalore, India, as well as gaining a Masters in Human Rights from the London School of Economics. In addition, Ramya was part of the team assisting counsel preparing submissions for R(HH) v Italy [2012] UKSC 25, concerning the human rights of children of extradited parents. Ramya therefore demonstrably has a particular interest and capability in cases raising human rights issues.
On a different note, Ramya has experience in financial crime, she worked at Corker Binning solicitors between 2011 and 2012, where she specialised in fraud cases, and primarily a multi-million pound carbon credit fraud. Furthermore, she is currently seconded to the Business Crime Group at Peters and Peters until November 2015.
Appointments
Ramya speaks decent Dutch, much better upper intermediate French and better, though homely, Kannada (a language native to the South Indian State of Karnataka)
Qualifications
London School of Economics (LLB) (2007)
London School of Economics (MSc in Human Rights) (2011)
College of Law, London (Bar Vocational Course) (2008)
Lincoln’s Inn Award for internship at the International Criminal Court (2008)
Jessup Mooting Competition (Award for Best Applicant Memorial) (2011)
Press
Committing criminal acts when sleepwalking: is it time to change the law? Criminal Bar Quarterly, 2015, 4 (Spring), 10-11;
Closed criminal proceedings or the "secret trial": past, present and future C.L. and J. 2015, 179(11)
Finding the Truth: An analysis of the El-Masri Decision before the European Court of Human Rights Criminal Bar Quarterly, 2013, 2 (Summer), 10-11;
The Scope of Legal Advice Privilege Criminal Law and Justice Weekly 2013, 177 (13/14), 218-219;
What to do with Al-Bashir: Options in International Law The Law Journal UK (2009)